Joan's Lens

the world through my (camera) lens (and other notes)
from the archive. Land of #Lincoln. (Taken with instagram)

from the archive. Land of #Lincoln. (Taken with instagram)

Wrigley settling into his new #home (Taken with Instagram at our house)

Wrigley settling into his new #home (Taken with Instagram at our house)

kenyatta:

China and Europe Both Have Plans To Prevent Deadly Asteroid Apophis from Hitting Earth in 2029 (or 2036)

Apophis is a 46 million tonne asteroid that will pass within a hair’s breath of Earth in 2029. However, Apophis’s trajectory is likely to take it through a region of space near Earth known as a keyhole that will ensure the asteroid returns in 2036.
Nobody knows how close Apophis will come on that pass. But if there’s a chance of a collision, we’ll have only 7 years to work out how to avoid catastrophe.
Researchers at Tsinghua University in Beijing say their preference is to use a solar sail to place a small spacecraft into a retrograde orbit and on collision course with Apophis. The retrograde orbit will give it an impact velocity of 90km/s which, if they do this well enough in advance, should lead to a collision large enough to do the trick.
In 2002, the European Space Agency began a program called Don Quijote to find out how best to perform such a deflection.
Don Quijote involves sending two spacecraft to a near Earth asteroid; one to smash into it and the other to watch while in orbit above the impact crater. The goal is to change the asteroid’s semimajor axis by more than 100 metres and to measure the change with an accuracy greater than 1 per cent.

via Technology Review


This blows my mind. An asteroid could collide with the earth in less than 20 years??

kenyatta:

China and Europe Both Have Plans To Prevent Deadly Asteroid Apophis from Hitting Earth in 2029 (or 2036)

Apophis is a 46 million tonne asteroid that will pass within a hair’s breath of Earth in 2029. However, Apophis’s trajectory is likely to take it through a region of space near Earth known as a keyhole that will ensure the asteroid returns in 2036.

Nobody knows how close Apophis will come on that pass. But if there’s a chance of a collision, we’ll have only 7 years to work out how to avoid catastrophe.

Researchers at Tsinghua University in Beijing say their preference is to use a solar sail to place a small spacecraft into a retrograde orbit and on collision course with Apophis. The retrograde orbit will give it an impact velocity of 90km/s which, if they do this well enough in advance, should lead to a collision large enough to do the trick.

In 2002, the European Space Agency began a program called Don Quijote to find out how best to perform such a deflection.

Don Quijote involves sending two spacecraft to a near Earth asteroid; one to smash into it and the other to watch while in orbit above the impact crater. The goal is to change the asteroid’s semimajor axis by more than 100 metres and to measure the change with an accuracy greater than 1 per cent.

via Technology Review

This blows my mind. An asteroid could collide with the earth in less than 20 years??

(via npr)

kitchen #bouquet (Taken with Instagram at Mom and Dad’s)

kitchen #bouquet (Taken with Instagram at Mom and Dad’s)

more #dahlias (Taken with Instagram at Mom and Dad’s)

more #dahlias (Taken with Instagram at Mom and Dad’s)

homegrown dahlias. Hoping we’ll have more of these in a week (Taken with Instagram at Mom and Dad’s)

homegrown dahlias. Hoping we’ll have more of these in a week (Taken with Instagram at Mom and Dad’s)

Had I gone looking for some particular place rather than any place, I’d have never found this spring under the sycamores. Since leaving home, I felt for the first time at rest. Sitting full in the moment, I practiced on the god-awful difficulty of just paying attention. It’s a contention of my father’s—believing as he does that anyone who misses the journey misses about all he’s going to get—that people become what they pay attention to. Our observations and curiosity, they make and remake us.

—(William Least Heat Moon, 1939 - )

beingblog:

The Brooms of Britain
by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

“I was sick of the senseless smashing up of our own communities. It’s good to see there’s a real sense of community with people from all over Liverpool — a vicar, mums, and students — coming to help.”
~Anna Mason, 16, who, after reading in Facebook about clean-up efforts, joined the community with broom in hand.

After all the coverage of riots and burning and breaking, here’s a heart-warming story coming out of England. Flocks of people are taking to the streets of London, Liverpool, and other areas with their brooms in hand to help restore their streets and sidewalks after the riots. At the heart of community is the enduring spirit of a people who weather the tumult of history and move forward.
It’s worth pointing out that, nearly six months ago, a similar sense of community bonding was taking place in Cairo with wonderful images of volunteers scrubbing down streets and one of the iconic lion statues at the Qasr el-Nil bridge leading to Tahrir Square after the protests. A bit of the connective tissue of humanity binds us together, non?
 (photo: John Moore/Getty Images)
About the lead image: People show their brooms to Boris Johnson, mayor of London, as they prepare to clean their streets in Clapham Junction, in south London. (photo: Paul Ellis/AFP/Getty Images)

Not just riots in London

beingblog:

The Brooms of Britain

by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

“I was sick of the senseless smashing up of our own communities. It’s good to see there’s a real sense of community with people from all over Liverpool — a vicar, mums, and students — coming to help.”

~Anna Mason, 16, who, after reading in Facebook about clean-up efforts, joined the community with broom in hand.

After all the coverage of riots and burning and breaking, here’s a heart-warming story coming out of England. Flocks of people are taking to the streets of London, Liverpool, and other areas with their brooms in hand to help restore their streets and sidewalks after the riots. At the heart of community is the enduring spirit of a people who weather the tumult of history and move forward.

It’s worth pointing out that, nearly six months ago, a similar sense of community bonding was taking place in Cairo with wonderful images of volunteers scrubbing down streets and one of the iconic lion statues at the Qasr el-Nil bridge leading to Tahrir Square after the protests. A bit of the connective tissue of humanity binds us together, non?

Egyptian Men Lion Statue
(photo: John Moore/Getty Images)

About the lead image: People show their brooms to Boris Johnson, mayor of London, as they prepare to clean their streets in Clapham Junction, in south London. (photo: Paul Ellis/AFP/Getty Images)

Not just riots in London

changing nature of photography

changing nature of photography

staff:

Name The Burning HouseLocation New York

If your house was burning, what would you take with you? The answer says a lot about your values and background, according to photographer Foster R. Huntington. The Burning House is a living gallery of photographs of the items chosen by people from all backgrounds, from all around the world. “It’s a philosophical conflict between what’s practical, valuable, and sentimental. You’re forced to prioritize and boil down a life of accrued possessions into what you can carry out with you,” Foster says.

Also check out…

The Changelog
A weekly podcast and blog that covers what’s fresh and new in Open Source.

Sounds of My City
A collaborative, community-oriented audio ethnography of Toronto. This is what Toronto sounds like.

Officials Say the Darndest Things
Cataloging what officials in business and government (and any other centers of power) let slip.

staff:

Name The Burning House
Location New York

If your house was burning, what would you take with you? The answer says a lot about your values and background, according to photographer Foster R. Huntington. The Burning House is a living gallery of photographs of the items chosen by people from all backgrounds, from all around the world. “It’s a philosophical conflict between what’s practical, valuable, and sentimental. You’re forced to prioritize and boil down a life of accrued possessions into what you can carry out with you,” Foster says.

Also check out…

The Changelog
A weekly podcast and blog that covers what’s fresh and new in Open Source.

Sounds of My City
A collaborative, community-oriented audio ethnography of Toronto. This is what Toronto sounds like.

Officials Say the Darndest Things
Cataloging what officials in business and government (and any other centers of power) let slip.